4.11 - 1251 ratings - Source

Ostension is bodily movement that manifests our engagement with things, whether we wish it to or not. Gestures, glances, facial expressions: all betray our interest in something. Ostension enables our first word learning, providing infants with a prelinguistic way to grasp the meaning of words. Ostension is philosophically puzzling; it cuts across domains seemingly unbridgeable -- public--private, inner--outer, mind--body. In this book, Chad Engelland offers a philosophical investigation of ostension and its role in word learning by infants. Engelland discusses ostension (distinguishing it from ostensive definition) in contemporary philosophy, examining accounts by Quine, Davidson, and Gadamer, and he explores relevant empirical findings in psychology, evolutionary anthropology, and neuroscience. He offers original studies of four representative historical thinkers whose work enriches the understanding of ostension: Wittgenstein, Merleau-Ponty, Augustine, and Aristotle. And, building on these philosophical and empirical foundations, Engelland offers a meticulous analysis of the philosophical issues raised by ostension. He examines the phenomenological problem of whether embodied intentions are manifest or inferred; the problem of what concept of mind allows ostensive cues to be intersubjectively available; the epistemological problem of how ostensive cues, notoriously ambiguous, can be correctly understood; and the metaphysical problem of the ultimate status of the key terms in his argument: animate movement, language, and mind. Finally, he argues for the centrality of manifestation in philosophy. Taking ostension seriously, he proposes, has far-reaching implications for thinking about language and the practice of philosophy.A note on method: by a€œmetaphysics, a€ I designate the inquiry into first principles and causes that Aristotle called a€œfirst ... To answer the question concerning the logical possibility of manifestation, wea#39;ll have to turn our attention away from ... in chapter 6, Aristotlea#39;s refutation of the denier of the principle Table 10.1 Chapter 10: The metaphysical problem. T5.1 Ostension as manifestation is a philosophical kind of movement irreducible to the mechanical movement of physics and physiology.

Author: Chad Engelland
Publisher:MIT Press - 2014-10-31

You must register with us as either a Registered User before you can Download this Book. You'll be greeted by a simple sign-up page.

Once you have finished the sign-up process, you will be redirected to your download Book page.

How it works:
  • 1. Register a free 1 month Trial Account.
  • 2. Download as many books as you like (Personal use)
  • 3. Cancel the membership at any time if not satisfied.

Click button below to register and download Ebook
Privacy Policy | Contact | DMCA